Synecdoches

Spring 2011 Senior Thesis Exhibition

Luke Earls

 

In a fraction of a second, there is a simultaneous recognition of the significance of an event as well as the precise organization of forms which gives the event its proper expression. Almost 60 years ago, Henri Cartier-Bresson authored this explanation of what he called the decisive moment. Although his photographic genre is quite different from mine, the phrase is very appropriate to a sports photographer, even one like myself. I can direct the lighting and action of my subjects but there is still a spontaneous element.

My process begins when I meet the athletes. Their sport and character suggests scenes and I begin scouting locations. Then, I can begin thinking of light and visual perspective.





Luke Earls

Luke Earls

Luke Earls

Luke Earls

Luke Earls

Luke Earls

Luke Earls
 




Luke Earls


 

A virtually limitless number of options present themselves with the ability to seclude or define quantities and selections of core shadows and specular highlights giving shape, dimension, and mood to a scene. Planning the shoot, equipment, environment and logistics begin to occupy my mind. When the actual shoot arrives, cultivating and extracting the nuances of the performance are foremost.

Communication becomes crucial along with diligence and exact timing to capture the action or a revealing moment within a portrait session. Then remaining open to the unexpected, the surprising gift or the unforeseen difficulty, requires improvisation.
Playing with light and time, combined with many remarkably skilled athletes, these images are the product of all I have learned thus far. They are the bridge to my future.

 

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